Everyone has memories to share, keep them alive forever.

Respectance fully understands that consumer behaviour changes towards death, grief and expressing emotions, and is offering the new way consumers want to interact and engage with death, dealing with a loss, and share that with the people around.

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Why should you use Respectance?

Losing a loved one is hard. To help you and let you hold on to memories, you can start a tribute. Dedicate a place online to your loved one. A tribute is free and it is forever. You can also leave memories and keep photos safe.

Whenever you have the need to feel the presence again of your loved one. Just go to the special place with memories and photos on your smartphone.

How easy is Respectance?

You make a special page and become the owner of all memories. Collect all those moments in words and pictures. You can keep it private or share it with friends and family. Together you can keep them alive and always come back and add new moments. You can identify yourself with a mail address or use Facebook to login.

We’re always there to assist you if you need help. You can build the memory as pleases you. Take your time.

What does Respectance bring you?

Starting a tribute is free. You can also sponsor a tribute and increase your options. Respectance is made for use on most computers, tablets and smartphones. You can access your tribute 24/7, whenever you feel the need. Sharing memories and reading and watching the stories of others is a great way to give your loss a place. A place in your heart.

Share your memories,

Kind regards,

The Respectance team

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Can I Use My Phone During a Funeral?

A recent study by Co-operative Funeralcare in the UK under 2,000 people over 18 who had attended a funeral, found that funerals considered to be the most inappropriate function where a mobile phone may be used. Second and third were weddings and while driving. However one in six people actually do use their phone during a funeral anyway. Apparently even the Duchess of York was caught texting while attending Margaret Thatcher’s funeral.

 The study also showed that 40 percent of the respondents would not turn off their phone, albeit that a third of that sets their phone to silent. Most however claim they have left their phone on inadvertently, much like people forget to switch off while on a plane. One in six people also said they had seen people (frantically and embarrassed) trying to switch off their phone once it rang.

 In a different study, under funeral directors, it became apparent that one in five funerals gets interrupted by a mobile phone ringing. One ironic anecdote said the ringtone was “If You Are Happy and You Know it Clap Your Hands”.David Collingwood, operations director of Co-operative Funeralcare, said the use of mobiles had “become commonplace at events which would have been considered unthinkable only a few years ago. We are witnessing a cultural shift in society’s stance on funeral etiquette “.

 

It seems like we have double standards when it comes to using our phones at seemingly inappropriate moments and functions.

Source: The Guardian