Everyone has memories to share, keep them alive forever.

Respectance fully understands that consumer behaviour changes towards death, grief and expressing emotions, and is offering the new way consumers want to interact and engage with death, dealing with a loss, and share that with the people around.

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Why should you use Respectance?

Losing a loved one is hard. To help you and let you hold on to memories, you can start a tribute. Dedicate a place online to your loved one. A tribute is free and it is forever. You can also leave memories and keep photos safe.

Whenever you have the need to feel the presence again of your loved one. Just go to the special place with memories and photos on your smartphone.

How easy is Respectance?

You make a special page and become the owner of all memories. Collect all those moments in words and pictures. You can keep it private or share it with friends and family. Together you can keep them alive and always come back and add new moments. You can identify yourself with a mail address or use Facebook to login.

We’re always there to assist you if you need help. You can build the memory as pleases you. Take your time.

What does Respectance bring you?

Starting a tribute is free. You can also sponsor a tribute and increase your options. Respectance is made for use on most computers, tablets and smartphones. You can access your tribute 24/7, whenever you feel the need. Sharing memories and reading and watching the stories of others is a great way to give your loss a place. A place in your heart.

Share your memories,

Kind regards,

The Respectance team

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Brenda Schmitz, a real guardian Angel.

Brenda Schmitz RIP Death Cancer Letter Christmas Wish Respectance #RIP

Brenda Schmitz

“Hello my name is Brenda Schmitz. When you are in receipt of this letter i will have already lost my battle to ovarian cancer.”

These are the words Brenda started her letter to her husband, 4 children and her husband’s new wife with. Brenda’s final wish before she died was to mail a very special letter to a local radio station the moment her husband David had moved on in his life. Brenda really wanted her husband to find a new lovely wife to share his life with.

Brenda asked for three special gifts in the local radio station’s Christmas wish program. First was a day or weekend full of pampering for the new woman in David’s life, because she deserves it.

“Being a step-mother to all those boys and especially giving lil’ Max a “mothers love” that only she can give.”

For the family- a magical trip somewhere where they all can enjoy their company and companionship as a family and create those memories that will be with them forever.

And finally for the cancer doctors at Mercy Hospital and nurses of 8 south. A night out full of drinks, food and fun for all they do everyday for cancer patients they encounter.

This must have been a very special Christmas gift.

Watch the video with her husbands emotional reaction here:

Thieves Have Found A New Low

A new warning from police about a trend so despicable, even veteran detectives are stunned: Thieves are now using funerals to rob families blind.

It doesn’t get much lower than this: Bands of thieves are targeting families at their most vulnerable. Here’s how it works: When you lose a loved one, you post an obituary in the paper, along with details of the funeral. The criminals know you won’t be home, and that’s when they strike… while you’re at the cemetery.

They are well-planned attacks: Thieves poring through local obituaries, and picking out the homes of grieving relatives.

When you leave for the funeral, the thieves move in. And they are heartless.

It happened to Cindy and Dennis Higdon. Their son Christian was tragically killed. But while they were at his funeral laying him to rest, thieves were ransacking their Kentucky home.

“It’s like, you already felt like you’re at the lowest point you could be and … it’s like I just fell to the ground,” Cindy Higdon said.

Police say the thieves found the family through an obituary in the local newspaper listing their full names, their hometown, and the date and time of the funeral. Investigators say two men, now charged, hit the house during the service, giving them hours to steal everything from expensive jewelry to computers to sentimental items from Christian’s own room.

“They took everything away from us; they put us into another level of low that we didn’t think could ever exist,” Dennis Higdon said.

We said: “You thought you were at the lowest –”

“Yes. Yes. Till we found out there’s still a long way to go.”

And police say it gets even more extreme. Near Seattle: 10 homes burglarized while the families were at funerals. Hundreds of thousands of dollars in possessions stolen.

“It’s heinous,” said lead investigator Margaret Ludwig. “It’s reprehensible.”

Ludwig busted three crooks, now in prison. They were running an obituary crime ring so sophisticated and organized, even seasoned investigators were stunned.

“They had their computers set up to where they would receive email notifications of the new obituaries that were coming into the local paper,” Ludwig told us. “Lots of planning, lots of preparation, a lot of thinking went into how they were going to pull this off.”

For victims who’ve already lost so much, it’s the ultimate invasion.

“It’s like, please, have a heart,” Cindy Higdon said. “I mean, think about the people you’re doing this to, what they’re already going through.”

The family is so traumatized, they’re planning to move out of the house. It just doesn’t feel like home anymore. Police say we can all learn from this, and there are ways to protect yourself.

Here’s the takeaway: If you have to write an obituary, don’t print your full name or your hometown; that makes it easy for criminals to find you. If you can, have a friend or neighbor stay at your house during the funeral to keep an eye on things. And if that’s not possible, park a few cars in your driveway to make it look like someone is home.

Obviously, losing a relative is hard enough, and it’s a shame we even have to think about this. But as we’ve seen, the criminals will stoop to any level to steal from you.

 

Source: Today

Suicide Has Become an Epidemic

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When Thomas Joiner was 25 years old, his father—whose name was also Thomas Joiner and who could do anything—disappeared from the family’s home. At the time, Joiner was a graduate student at the University of Texas, studying clinical psychology. His focus was depression, and it was obvious to him that his father was depressed. Six weeks earlier, on a family trip to the Georgia coast, the gregarious 56-year-old—the kind of guy who was forever talking and laughing and bending people his way—was sullen and withdrawn, spending days in bed, not sick or hungover, not really sleeping.

Joiner knew enough not to worry. He knew that the desire for death—the easy way out, the only relief—was a symptom of depression, and although at least 2 percent of those diagnosed make suicide their final chart line, his father didn’t match the suicidal types he had learned about in school. He wasn’t weak or impulsive. He wasn’t a brittle person with bad genes and big problems. Suicide was understood to be for losers, basically, the exact opposite of men like Thomas Joiner Sr.—a successful businessman, a former Marine, tough even by Southern standards.

But Dad had left an unmade bed in a spare room, and an empty spot where his van usually went. By nightfall he hadn’t been heard from, and the following morning Joiner’s mother called him at school. The police had found the van. It was parked in an office lot about a mile from the house, the engine cold. Inside, in the back, the police found Joiner’s father dead, covered in blood. He had been stabbed through the heart.

The investigators found slash marks on his father’s wrists and a note on a yellow sticky pad by the driver’s seat. “Is this the answer?” it read, in his father’s shaky scrawl. They ruled it a suicide, death by “puncture wound,” an impossibly grisly way to go, which made it all the more difficult for Joiner to understand. This didn’t seem like the easy way out.

Back home for the funeral, Joiner’s pain and confusion were compounded by ancient taboos. For centuries suicide was considered an act against God, a violation of law, and a stain on the community. He overheard one relative advise another to call it a heart attack. His girlfriend fretted about his tainted DNA. Even some of his peers and professors—highly trained, doctoral-level clinicians—failed to offer a simple “my condolences.” It was as though the Joiner family had failed dear old Dad, killed him somehow, just as surely as if they had stabbed him themselves. To Joiner, however, the only real failing was from his field, which clearly had a shaky understanding of suicide.

The entire article is a big read, but definately worth it! Check it out here on Newsweek

 

 

Can I Use My Phone During a Funeral?

A recent study by Co-operative Funeralcare in the UK under 2,000 people over 18 who had attended a funeral, found that funerals considered to be the most inappropriate function where a mobile phone may be used. Second and third were weddings and while driving. However one in six people actually do use their phone during a funeral anyway. Apparently even the Duchess of York was caught texting while attending Margaret Thatcher’s funeral.

 The study also showed that 40 percent of the respondents would not turn off their phone, albeit that a third of that sets their phone to silent. Most however claim they have left their phone on inadvertently, much like people forget to switch off while on a plane. One in six people also said they had seen people (frantically and embarrassed) trying to switch off their phone once it rang.

 In a different study, under funeral directors, it became apparent that one in five funerals gets interrupted by a mobile phone ringing. One ironic anecdote said the ringtone was “If You Are Happy and You Know it Clap Your Hands”.David Collingwood, operations director of Co-operative Funeralcare, said the use of mobiles had “become commonplace at events which would have been considered unthinkable only a few years ago. We are witnessing a cultural shift in society’s stance on funeral etiquette “.

 

It seems like we have double standards when it comes to using our phones at seemingly inappropriate moments and functions.

Source: The Guardian