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The Five Stages of Designer Grief

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Source: Mashable

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How Much Should Be Spent Beautifying Hospitals?

Where the evidence exists to support it, design has the potential to increase safety, promote healing, and even end up saving money.

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No matter how close a health care center comes to resembling a spa, or how well a hospital room imitates a hotel suite, its primary job is to heal, not pamper. With the scarcity of health care dollars already preventing people from receiving access to basic care, it’s easy to look on hospitals’ pouring of money into design as unconscionable excess.

But while indulgence surely occurs for indulgence’s sake, numerous studies have established that the environment — its colors, sounds, and other design characteristics aside from its cleanliness — may have a direct influence on health and healing. Elements like artificial light and unwanted sounds have been linked to physical effects similar to those caused by stress, such as raised blood pressure, along with symptoms of depression. Natural light has been shown to have mood-elevating and pain-easing qualities; the presence of trees and nature appear to impact human health in subtle but measurable ways as well. Easing anxiety and creating a positive atmosphere for healing, it is argued, can lead to tangible outcomes.

“A revolution in the science of design is already under way,” according an article in last week’s New York Times’ Sunday Review. This is certainly the case in health care: the emerging field of “evidence-based design” aims to introduce elements of construction and atmosphere proven to promote healing.

The tactic is purely logical from a basic science perspective. Rugs, for instance, may be a bad choice for a space simply because carpeting houses more bacteria than bare floors.

Check out the entire article here on The Atlantic

Is Legacy.com Committing Fraud?

I know the title makes many of you laugh but were asking for real this time. We don’t full know how Legacy operates when it comes to their payment structure, what is free, what is paid for or what it only online temporary. In the past when we have talked about Legacy and sent them questions for comment we have never received a reply. So we didn’t even bother on this story.

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We received the following comment on Sunday morning. Please read the comment and let us know your thoughts. Is this really happening and if so what has your or your client family’s experience been? If this is true then Legacy.com could be raking in millions by screwing over grieving families.

 

Read the entire article here on Connecting Directors

Does Facebook improve your memory?

Study: Facebook May Improve Memory

Broadening online worlds could help maintain and improve cognitive abilities in old age.

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Conor Friedersdorf recently put forward an interesting question: At what age will you stop using Facebook? Many of the college students, now twentysomethings, who made up Facebook’s original user base may already be feeling the fatigue. But it may be through other groups of people, for whom the site was never specifically intended but have nonetheless been discovering it in droves, that Facebook may find new ways of remaining relevant.

Janelle Wohltmann, a grad student in psychology at the University of Arizona, has been teaching the 65-plus crowd how to use the social network, in order to determine ways in which using Facebook might benefit them. She gathered a small group of adults, aged 68 to 91, who were either unfamiliar with Facebook or who had set up a profile, but rarely used it. Like a protective parent, she asked them to limit their network, only friending other members of their training group, but she also required that they post updates at least once a day.

Meanwhile, another 14 participants were asked to post short entries to a private online diary site, and yet another group — the control — were told they were on a waiting list for the Facebook lessons.

Before joining Facebook, all of her subjects participated in a series of tests and questionnaires designed to measure both social variables and cognitive ability. At the end of eight weeks, they were re-tested.

Her analysis is ongoing, but Wohltmann has already presented one finding of the study: the adults who spent the two months on Facebook showed a 25 percent improvement in their working memory. Specifically, when confronted with a continuous stream of information, like random words or letters, they were better able to focus on what the researchers told them was relevant. Being able to monitor such information and quickly add or delete the contents of their working memory, is known as “mental updating ability.”

 

Read the entire article here on the Atlantic

Final resting place of Freddie Mercury found

Fans of Queen frontman Freddie Mercury claim to have found clue to singer’s final resting place

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He was one of rock’s most famous singers but Freddie Mercury’s final resting place has always remained a mystery.

Now fans believe they have found a clue to where the ashes of the Queen frontman were scattered in Kensal Green Cemetery in West London more than two decades after he died.

A memorial plaque to the singer has been found in the cemetery along with a description that reads: “In Loving Memory of Farrokh Bulsara”.

It adds in French: “Pour Etre Toujours Pres De Toi Avec Tout Mon Amour”, meaning “So I Can Always Be Close To You With All My Love”.

Farrokh Bulsara was Mercury’s real name before he changed it in 1971 following the creation of Queen.

The memorial is marked with the letter ‘M’, which fans think stands for his former lover Mary Austin.

Read the entire article HERE

Police Notify Mother About Son’s Death Over Facebook

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Anna Lamb-Creasey’s son had disappeared without a trace. She called hospitals and jails. She waited for days and then weeks and then a month, desperate for a sign of life. She posted to his Facebook page: “Rickie where are you? Love mom.”

Rickie was dead.

Lamb-Creasy might have known this sooner — if only she had checked a hidden folder on her Facebook page that most people don’t even know exists. Waiting in what’s called the “Other” folder was a message from the Clayton County, Ga., police telling her to call them.

She didn’t discover the message for nearly a month.

When you send a message to someone you don’t know on Facebook, it gets sequestered to the hidden “Other” folder, which only appears as a grayed-out tab on the site’s main messages tab. The police, like so many other Facebook users, probably have no idea this happens. (Here’s what it looks like, with emphasis added.)

Indeed, the only way to get a stranger to see your message on Facebook is tocough up $1. That will guarantee it goes to the recipient’s real mailbox. This just one ofmany cash grabs implemented by Facebook since its initial public offering last year, as the world’s largest social network chases profit to please new stockholders. Lamb-Creasy’s desperate search for her son may be the most harrowing and explicit example of how the feature does real harm to Facebook’s 1 billion users.

Read the entire article HERE

‘When your heart stops beating, you’ll keep tweeting’

A new Twitter service will allow users to carry on their stream of consciousness in 140 characters or less from beyond the grave.

LivesOn will analyse users’ Twitter feeds to learn their ‘likes, tastes, [and] syntax’ to continue posting similar messages, updates and links after they’ve passed.

The service, due to launch in March, promises: ‘When your heart stops beating, you’ll keep tweeting.’

 

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LivesOn is being developed by London-based advertising agency Lean Mean Fighting Machine.

Dave Bedwood, a creative partner at the firm, told the Guardian he was ready for negative responses to the service.

‘It divides people on a gut level, before you even get to the philosophical and ethical arguments,’ he said.

‘It offends some, and delights others. Imagine if people started to see it as a legitimate but small way to live on.

‘Cryogenics costs a fortune; this is free and I’d bet it will work better than a frozen head.’

 

Although it is similar to the plot of last week’s episode of Channel 4 sitcom Black Mirror, in which a woman uses social media to talk to her dead boyfriend, the developers claim they came up with the service in 2011.

Posts on the LivesOn Twitter feed explain how the ‘idea was born a couple of years ago. been getting tech partners together.

‘[T]hen black mirror themes were in the press and it seemed the perfect time to get something up. But we are genuinely doing the experiment.’
Source: Daily Mail